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Efficacy of eight commercial disinfectants against Microsporum canis and Trichophyton sp. infective spores on an experimentally contaminated textile surface

Veterinary Dermatology, 24: 621-e152. doi:10.111/vde.12074.

Moriello, K., Kunder, D. and Hondzo, H. (2013).

The purpose of this study was to determine whether over-the-counter products, particularly ready-to-use formulations, with label claim as fungicidal are effective against Microsporum or Trichophyton spores isolated from cat hair.

BACKGROUND:An important part of treatment of dermatophytosis is the removal of infective material and decontamination of the environment. It is recognized that the role of disinfectants is to kill infective material not removed during the mechanical removal of debris and gross cleaning steps. A widely used disinfectant in the home is a dilute solution of sodium hypochlorite. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES:To determine whether over-the-counter products, particularly ready-to-use formulations, with label claim as fungicidal are effective against Microsporum or Trichophyton spores isolated from cat hair.

METHODS:Eight commercial disinfectants were tested in vitro for fungicidal efficacy using three different trials and a 10 min contact time, as follows: a standard 1:10 spore dilution suspension test; 1 and 5 mL of disinfectant solution applied to contaminated gauze fabric; and, to simulate home use, one and five sprays of disinfectant applied to contaminated gauze. Good efficacy was defined as a product that completely inhibited growth.

RESULTS:All products completely inhibited growth in the suspension test. Four of eight products showed complete inhibition of growth of both pathogens on the textile test after 1 mL or one spray; however, all eight products showed complete inhibition of pathogen growth after 5 mL or five sprays

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:Aggressive removal of contaminated material followed by thorough application of commercial ready-to-use disinfectants labelled as fungicidal against Trichophyton mentagrophytes are alternatives to dilute sodium hypochlorite.

© 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

Topics: AHP® Peer Reviewed Articles (Companion Animal), AHP® Peer Reviewed Articles (Farm Animal)